Thursday, January 4, 2024

Featured in Box Set Celebrating Columbia's Centennial and HIS GIRL FRIDAY

 

Happy New Year! 2024 is the 100th anniversary of Columbia Pictures and I'm excited to announce I have my own featurette included in a 4K boxed set that will be released February 13 to celebrate the studio's centennial. I spoke about His Girl Friday (1940) and its costume designer Robert Kalloch. It's a fascinating story with many layers (in more ways than one).

Of course Kalloch's contributions to Columbia don't end there. As the studio's head costume designer from 1932 to 1940, his work also included the equally iconic wardrobe in It Happened One Night (1934) along with Twentieth Century (1934), The Awful Truth (1937), and Holiday (1938).

As you know, I always love showing the ongoing influence of classic film and its costume design. If you watched The Morning Show this past season, Jennifer Aniston wore a pinstripe suit from Dolce & Gabbana for her character's final power move. Of course its origins are courtesy of Kalloch and Rosalind Russell in His Girl Friday.

The limited-edition box set features other Columbia Classics through the decades, such as Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967), Kramer vs. Kramer (1979), and Sleepless in Seattle (1993)Click here to see the full list of films and all the extras that are included in this new collection. Because of the new release, I appeared on The Extras podcast with Steven Smith to discuss everything from the early days of Columbia Pictures to exploring even more of what makes His Girl Friday so great.


Kalloch's style story for Rosalind Russell in His Girl Friday 
starts with this striped coat and coordinated hat


His Girl Friday's iconic pinstripe suit has inspired countless others in film and fashion,
including the Dolce & Gabbana suit Jennifer Aniston wears in the climax of The Morning Show



Kalloch designed many celebrated wardrobes in film for Columbia including (clockwise from top left)
The Awful Truth (1937), Holiday (1938), It Happened One Night (1934), and Twentieth Century (1934)

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